Monday, June 25, 2012
‘Tis the season for seaside cookouts and beach reads, clams and mussels and pulpy paperbacks in quantity. We’d recommend Bren Smith’s Thimble Island Oyster Co. as a source of the former and Lucky Peach issue 4 for the latter. We’re longtime fans of Lucky Peach (especially since co-founders Peter Meehan and David Chang came speak at Yale this past spring), and this issue, which focuses on American food, features YSFP alum Nozlee Samadzadeh writing about the invasive species now making their homes in our country’s fields, lakes and streams. Of course she interviews another close friend of the Project, Chef Bun Lai, whose inventive recipes make use of the abundance of invasive Asian shore crabs in the waters near New Haven. Nozlee’s piece, like Bun’s cooking, offers an innovative way of looking at a seemingly insoluble problem— by recognizing that so-called invasive species are here to stay, and that integrating them into our vocabularies and diets might be the best way to handle their presence on our shores.

‘Tis the season for seaside cookouts and beach reads, clams and mussels and pulpy paperbacks in quantity. We’d recommend Bren Smith’s Thimble Island Oyster Co. as a source of the former and Lucky Peach issue 4 for the latter. We’re longtime fans of Lucky Peach (especially since co-founders Peter Meehan and David Chang came speak at Yale this past spring), and this issue, which focuses on American food, features YSFP alum Nozlee Samadzadeh writing about the invasive species now making their homes in our country’s fields, lakes and streams. Of course she interviews another close friend of the Project, Chef Bun Lai, whose inventive recipes make use of the abundance of invasive Asian shore crabs in the waters near New Haven. Nozlee’s piece, like Bun’s cooking, offers an innovative way of looking at a seemingly insoluble problem— by recognizing that so-called invasive species are here to stay, and that integrating them into our vocabularies and diets might be the best way to handle their presence on our shores.

Tuesday, February 14, 2012
Forget February and any Valentine’s Day blues: think ahead to warm months and the Alpine strawberries that show up at the Yale Farm each June, and apply to be one of our summer interns for the 2012 season. Applications are available here and due Friday by 10:00 pm.

Forget February and any Valentine’s Day blues: think ahead to warm months and the Alpine strawberries that show up at the Yale Farm each June, and apply to be one of our summer interns for the 2012 season. Applications are available here and due Friday by 10:00 pm.

Monday, January 30, 2012
This winter has been weirdly mild so far, but that hasn’t stopped us at the YSFP from getting excited about the coming of summer. There are two awesome ways to get involved in the coming months:
Apply to be a Harvest leader. Facilitate incoming freshmen’s first experiences with Yale and each other by spending a week with them on a small-scale organic Connecticut farm. Work during the day, hang out at night, cook fresh food and sleep under the stars. This year’s trips run from August 19-24, with leaders arriving August 15 for training. No experience with food, farming or the program is required and all are encouraged to apply.
Or, if you’re looking for something a little more intensive, apply to be a Yale Farm summer intern! Spend 12 weeks on our one-acre market garden, learning the principles of small-scale sustainable growing and meeting some of the folks who do it full time in neighboring cities. Experience with farming, gardening and growing is encouraged but not required; a love of cooperative work and the great outdoors is a must.
Unfortunately, both of these opportunities are limited to current Yale undergraduates; non-Yalies seeking positions in sustainable agriculture should check out Good Food Jobs for alternatives.

This winter has been weirdly mild so far, but that hasn’t stopped us at the YSFP from getting excited about the coming of summer. There are two awesome ways to get involved in the coming months:

Apply to be a Harvest leader. Facilitate incoming freshmen’s first experiences with Yale and each other by spending a week with them on a small-scale organic Connecticut farm. Work during the day, hang out at night, cook fresh food and sleep under the stars. This year’s trips run from August 19-24, with leaders arriving August 15 for training. No experience with food, farming or the program is required and all are encouraged to apply.

Or, if you’re looking for something a little more intensive, apply to be a Yale Farm summer intern! Spend 12 weeks on our one-acre market garden, learning the principles of small-scale sustainable growing and meeting some of the folks who do it full time in neighboring cities. Experience with farming, gardening and growing is encouraged but not required; a love of cooperative work and the great outdoors is a must.

Unfortunately, both of these opportunities are limited to current Yale undergraduates; non-Yalies seeking positions in sustainable agriculture should check out Good Food Jobs for alternatives.