Monday, January 30, 2012
This winter has been weirdly mild so far, but that hasn’t stopped us at the YSFP from getting excited about the coming of summer. There are two awesome ways to get involved in the coming months:
Apply to be a Harvest leader. Facilitate incoming freshmen’s first experiences with Yale and each other by spending a week with them on a small-scale organic Connecticut farm. Work during the day, hang out at night, cook fresh food and sleep under the stars. This year’s trips run from August 19-24, with leaders arriving August 15 for training. No experience with food, farming or the program is required and all are encouraged to apply.
Or, if you’re looking for something a little more intensive, apply to be a Yale Farm summer intern! Spend 12 weeks on our one-acre market garden, learning the principles of small-scale sustainable growing and meeting some of the folks who do it full time in neighboring cities. Experience with farming, gardening and growing is encouraged but not required; a love of cooperative work and the great outdoors is a must.
Unfortunately, both of these opportunities are limited to current Yale undergraduates; non-Yalies seeking positions in sustainable agriculture should check out Good Food Jobs for alternatives.

This winter has been weirdly mild so far, but that hasn’t stopped us at the YSFP from getting excited about the coming of summer. There are two awesome ways to get involved in the coming months:

Apply to be a Harvest leader. Facilitate incoming freshmen’s first experiences with Yale and each other by spending a week with them on a small-scale organic Connecticut farm. Work during the day, hang out at night, cook fresh food and sleep under the stars. This year’s trips run from August 19-24, with leaders arriving August 15 for training. No experience with food, farming or the program is required and all are encouraged to apply.

Or, if you’re looking for something a little more intensive, apply to be a Yale Farm summer intern! Spend 12 weeks on our one-acre market garden, learning the principles of small-scale sustainable growing and meeting some of the folks who do it full time in neighboring cities. Experience with farming, gardening and growing is encouraged but not required; a love of cooperative work and the great outdoors is a must.

Unfortunately, both of these opportunities are limited to current Yale undergraduates; non-Yalies seeking positions in sustainable agriculture should check out Good Food Jobs for alternatives.

Friday, July 22, 2011
Friday photo: the interns spend part of each Wednesday visiting a local farm, but given the record high temperatures this week we decided to skip that and go swimming at Miller’s Pond instead. It was pretty idyllic, but don’t worry, they’re still working: today they came at 6:00am in order to get harvest done before the produce got too wilted.

Friday photo: the interns spend part of each Wednesday visiting a local farm, but given the record high temperatures this week we decided to skip that and go swimming at Miller’s Pond instead. It was pretty idyllic, but don’t worry, they’re still working: today they came at 6:00am in order to get harvest done before the produce got too wilted.

Wednesday, July 6, 2011

Here are a couple of quick snaps from this morning’s field trip to Massaro Community Farm!

Farm Manager Steve Munno gave us a tour and talked about the history, mission, and layout of the space before putting us to work weeding dill and cilantro that were getting clobbered by competing plants after an unusually wet spring. It’s a very cool place: Massaro was a family-run dairy farm until the last owners died without heirs in 2007, at which point the land was deeded to the town of Woodbridge. They decided to continue operating the land as a production farm in order to, as their missions says, “feed people and build community.”

Unlike the Yale Farm, which is primarily an educational space intended to introduce volunteers to the basics of food and growing, Massaro is production-scale operation that feeds some 150 members with its twenty two-week Community Supported Agriculture program during the summer and fall months. The CSA model is an important one, particularly for news farms: since customers buy a share of produce upfront, farmers have cash in hand at the beginning of the season when they need it most for seeds, tools, and infrastructural improvements. Next time we go we’re hoping to help with the harvest and CSA share pickup, since all of our produce is sold at a farmers’ market. Massaro’s summer shares are sold out, but they should be taking fall sign-ups soon, so if you’re in the area, check them out!

Thursday, June 30, 2011
Hey! My name is Erin and I’m a rising junior and summer Farm intern for the YSFP. I’ve loved spending days outside and working hard (and not-so-hard) so far this summer. What I love most about the farm is how much there is to learn, from the names of the plants in the perennial beds to the proper way to care for tomatoes to types of pests found commonly in New England. 
 I grew up in Albuquerque, New Mexico and had a childhood heavy on fast food. When I started learning to cook in high school, for the first time I realized that food could be really delicious and still be good for you. I’ve been obsessed ever since.  I’m majoring in Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies and I’m really interested in social movements — the civil rights movement, feminism, gay rights — and I’m involved in environmental and food security activism because I think it’s the important social movement of our time. 

Hey! My name is Erin and I’m a rising junior and summer Farm intern for the YSFP. I’ve loved spending days outside and working hard (and not-so-hard) so far this summer. What I love most about the farm is how much there is to learn, from the names of the plants in the perennial beds to the proper way to care for tomatoes to types of pests found commonly in New England. 

 I grew up in Albuquerque, New Mexico and had a childhood heavy on fast food. When I started learning to cook in high school, for the first time I realized that food could be really delicious and still be good for you. I’ve been obsessed ever since.  I’m majoring in Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies and I’m really interested in social movements — the civil rights movement, feminism, gay rights — and I’m involved in environmental and food security activism because I think it’s the important social movement of our time. 

Over the course of these next few weeks, as we ease into our new blogspace, we’ll be introducing both ourselves and our Farm with posts on who we are, what we grow, and how to cook with that produce. We let the interns write these themselves, as you’ll see below. 
Jonah, after burning all his other bridges, has found himself slaving away on the Yale Farm this summer. When not lamenting this cruel, karmic conundrum, Jonah can be found cruising around the Have on his pretty new green Schwinn. He begrudgingly admits that access to fresh sage is the greatest bounty in the lord’s pantry, and hopes to incorporate said bounty into his morning routine via sage-butter on moist, crusty wedges of bread. If the container is organized this fall, you will have him to thank. Off the farm, Jonah co-coordinates the Harvest preorientation program, organizing trips to CT farms for small groups of incoming freshmen. He also studies cities and visual culture within the American Studies major, which he will be finishing up his during his next and last year at Yale. After that he hopes to make his way down to New Orleans.

Over the course of these next few weeks, as we ease into our new blogspace, we’ll be introducing both ourselves and our Farm with posts on who we are, what we grow, and how to cook with that produce. We let the interns write these themselves, as you’ll see below.

Jonah, after burning all his other bridges, has found himself slaving away on the Yale Farm this summer. When not lamenting this cruel, karmic conundrum, Jonah can be found cruising around the Have on his pretty new green Schwinn. He begrudgingly admits that access to fresh sage is the greatest bounty in the lord’s pantry, and hopes to incorporate said bounty into his morning routine via sage-butter on moist, crusty wedges of bread. If the container is organized this fall, you will have him to thank.

Off the farm, Jonah co-coordinates the Harvest preorientation program, organizing trips to CT farms for small groups of incoming freshmen. He also studies cities and visual culture within the American Studies major, which he will be finishing up his during his next and last year at Yale. After that he hopes to make his way down to New Orleans.

Monday, June 27, 2011

 

Over the course of these next few weeks, as we ease into our new blogspace, we’ll be introducing both ourselves and our Farm with posts on who we are, what we grow, and how to cook with that produce.

Hey Y’all!  I’m Cody, a rising junior and American Studies major.  I am too excited to be on the farm this summer; after having spent the long and grueling New Haven winter indoors, this southern boy just had to get outside in the sunshine and dirt.  The YSFP and the Yale Farm are two of the most enriching and dynamic experiences of my Yale career, and I couldn’t imagine spending this summer any other way.

Not only do I love farming myself after having raised bantam chickens all my childhood (a practice from my great grandma), but I love the study of farms.  Hopefully, I’ll soon begin research into the sexual politics of the farm and the radical queer potential within the local foods movement.  My projects this summer are to learn to make a mean latte, practice yoga, and write the first act to a queer space odyssey.

Thursday, June 23, 2011
Over the course of this week, as we ease into our new blogspace,  we’ll be introducing both ourselves and our Farm with posts on who we  are, what we grow, and how to cook with that produce. 
Hi! my name is Brian Tang and I’m an Environmental Studies major in the class of 2012 and a Yale Farm Summer Intern. I volunteer at the Farm all the time during the school year—Yale Farm pizza is the best on earth and is reason enough to come back every week.

Over the course of this week, as we ease into our new blogspace, we’ll be introducing both ourselves and our Farm with posts on who we are, what we grow, and how to cook with that produce.

Hi! my name is Brian Tang and I’m an Environmental Studies major in the class of 2012 and a Yale Farm Summer Intern. I volunteer at the Farm all the time during the school year—Yale Farm pizza is the best on earth and is reason enough to come back every week.

Over the course of this week, as we ease into our new blogspace,  we’ll be introducing both ourselves and our Farm with posts on who we  are, what we grow, and how to cook with that produce. 
My name is Caroline, and I am happily spending the summer as a farm intern for the YSFP, and trying to teach myself to cook on the side. I decided to work for the YSFP this summer because I have met most of my close friends at this university at the Yale Farm, and consider it a place that is welcoming and fun and where the things I care about are also at the forefront of the minds of the others there. Plus, there aren’t too many jobs where you spend all day in the sun with your friends, and come home with your body satisfied from a day of physical work. 
 I grew up in Denver, Colorado, where I became interested in issues of water and sustainability of urban areas in arid lands. I’m a rising junior Russian major with an interest in the parallels of “soil and soul” and frontiersm between Russian and American literature. I also manage one of the two the letterpresses on campus, and eat carrots in even numbers. When I grow up I hope to have a yard with fruit trees.

Over the course of this week, as we ease into our new blogspace, we’ll be introducing both ourselves and our Farm with posts on who we are, what we grow, and how to cook with that produce.

My name is Caroline, and I am happily spending the summer as a farm intern for the YSFP, and trying to teach myself to cook on the side. I decided to work for the YSFP this summer because I have met most of my close friends at this university at the Yale Farm, and consider it a place that is welcoming and fun and where the things I care about are also at the forefront of the minds of the others there. Plus, there aren’t too many jobs where you spend all day in the sun with your friends, and come home with your body satisfied from a day of physical work. 

 I grew up in Denver, Colorado, where I became interested in issues of water and sustainability of urban areas in arid lands. I’m a rising junior Russian major with an interest in the parallels of “soil and soul” and frontiersm between Russian and American literature. I also manage one of the two the letterpresses on campus, and eat carrots in even numbers. When I grow up I hope to have a yard with fruit trees.