Friday, January 17, 2014

Miya’s Sushi: How to Adapt Traditional Cuisine So Both Sushi and Ocean Life Can Survive

Jackson Blum ‘15, a farm intern, drew upon his love of a local sushi restaurant and a Yale College course he took to make an informative and entertaining podcast.

This past fall semester, I took Karen Seto’s Environmental Studies seminar “Urbanization, Food Systems, and the Environment.” In lieu of a boring final assessment, like a test or research paper, the students each created some kind of outreach project that presented some of the class’s takeaway lessons in a publicly digestible form. I elected to have a little fun and produce a podcast. My subject: my favorite New Haven sushi restaurant.

In early December, the class got together for a closing dinner, catered by Miya’s Sushi. The head chef and manager of Miya’s, Bun Lai, said a few words about the philosophy of his restaurant and its place in the modern world of sushi. I recorded Bun’s remarks about the popular Japanese cuisine and turned it into a podcast that illustrates the perils that many fish species experience in the face of the modern seafood industry and how one New Haven restaurateur and sushi chef hopes to address these challenges.

Wednesday, October 2, 2013

A Video from Eamon Heberlein ‘16

Hello, folks!
Eamon Heberlein here. I’m new to Yale and new to the YSFP. I grew up in rural Wisconsin surrounded by an agricultural community at the forefront of the organic and CSA movements. Ergo, I have a deep love for food, good land, all things cow-related, and the smells and sounds of the farm.
After graduating from Deep Springs College in June of 2012, I took a year off to escape academia and engage in agriculture from a different perspective. I spent two summers running cattle through California’s White Mountains at Deep Springs, and spent much of my interim period in Nepal and India.
In Nepal I taught computer skills to high school students in a remote Magar village in the mid-hills of the Himalayas. However, most of every day was spent outside the classroom as an assistant researcher interviewing farmers and working with them in their fields. Later I helped an organization train settling nomadic Chepang people in biodynamic agriculture in Nepal’s Terrai, and in India I interned on Vandana Shiva’s ”Navdanya” farm and seed bank.
Rather than try and synthesize these experiences, I put together some images from this past year; a sort of evocation of the simple everyday work and lives in these farms, villages and urban centers. The music consists of a friend, Moti, singing a traditional Magar work song, and then children from the Magar village singing the Nepali national anthem.

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Thursday, November 1, 2012
One of our interns, Ryan Healey ‘14, scored a summer spot with Lucky Peach after co-founders Peter Meehan and David Chang gave a master’s tea as part of our Chewing the Fat speaker series last spring. Check out the fruits of his labor in their latest issue, and look out for his name in the masthead!
momofuku:

behold, lucky peach 5: the chinatown issue. explore what happens when chinese food leaves the motherland. read up on chinese-korean noodles, the san gabriel valley, opium dens, crab rangoons and magical white balls. pick up the issue on november 13th or pre-order a copy (or subscription) today. want even more lucky peach? david chang will be talking issue 5 on late night with jimmy fallon tonight. tune in at 12:35/11:35C!

One of our interns, Ryan Healey ‘14, scored a summer spot with Lucky Peach after co-founders Peter Meehan and David Chang gave a master’s tea as part of our Chewing the Fat speaker series last spring. Check out the fruits of his labor in their latest issue, and look out for his name in the masthead!

momofuku:

behold, lucky peach 5: the chinatown issue. explore what happens when chinese food leaves the motherland. read up on chinese-korean noodles, the san gabriel valley, opium dens, crab rangoons and magical white balls. pick up the issue on november 13th or pre-order a copy (or subscription) today. want even more lucky peach? david chang will be talking issue 5 on late night with jimmy fallon tonight. tune in at 12:35/11:35C!

This year’s Harvest tee shirts— as pictured on Yale Farm Manager Jeremy Oldfield, above— were such a hit that we decided to make them available to the general public. The first crop of KALE tee shirts will be on sale at the CitySeed Wooster Square Farmers’ Market this Saturday starting at 9am, and since we have a limited selection of sizes you’ll want to stop by early to make sure that yours (and your friends’ and families’) are still in stock. At $15/each they’re sure to make perfect holiday gifts for the lovers of learning and leafy greens in your life! 

Thursday, October 18, 2012 Tuesday, October 2, 2012

When we say that Farm workdays happen rain or shine, we mean it— and we proved it this past Friday, as interns harvested for the next morning’s farmers’ market in some pretty bleak weather. These hearty souls were rewarded with plenty of hot, delicious pizza at the end of the day— plus the satisfaction of a difficult job well done, of course. It’s really heartening to have an intern crew and a corps of volunteers who show up on damp and dreary days ready to work, knowing that harvest has to happen whether it’s nice out or not. So thanks to everyone who lent a hand, and a special thanks to our photographer Elif, who captured everyone’s goofy raingear and exceptionally good spirits.

Wednesday, September 19, 2012

Honey : A Taste of Fall

Autumn by Paik666 from DeviantArt.com

                               Image courtesy of Paik666 from DeviantArt.com

     Autumn. What does that word remind you of? Let me guess. The crunch of yellowed leaves, the nip in the air, the heavy weight of a mug filled to the brim with pumpkin spice coffee, or perhaps the warm scent of cinnamon mingling with the distinctive sweet smell of baked apples. Sweater weather, woodsmoke in your hair: you get the picture.

     But for me? Fall is embodied in the crunch of a delicately fragrant Jiro persimmon, and the satisfying umami aftertaste of a rich stew of Kabocha, a Japanese variety of winter melon, and kombu, an edible kelp. And, being Chinese American, autumn for me has always meant mooncakes. Those intricate delicacies with a sweet, dense filling of red bean or lotus seed paste, enveloped by a thin pastry skin imprinted with a Chinese character on top. All of these things presaged autumn, but only one thing meant it had arrived: the first taste of my mother’s honey lemon tea.

     My mom, a Baby Boomer but a proud member of the iGeneration, as she likes to say, is nonetheless a devout believer in traditional Chinese medicine. That’s why, on the first day of September, she scours through our local farmers’ market for the highest quality raw honey she can find. Do you have wildflower, sage, or clover honey? Where’s the nectar source? What’s that? That’s not even in the Bay Area!

     Eventually, she ends up discovering the best the market has to offer. Then, once we’re home, she adds a generous spoonful of honey to a glass mug of piping hot water, allowing the amber-colored tendrils to dance with the swirl of the stirring spoon. After the honey has dissolved, she squeezes a quarter of a large lemon into the cup. The lemon’s pulp and seeds stipple the honeyed water, and barely drift towards the bottom of the cup when the wedge itself is dropped in.

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Thursday, September 13, 2012
A new school year means lots of new faces around the Sustainable Food Project offices and at the Yale Farm. We’ll be using this space to introduce you to some of them in the next few weeks; make sure to stop by work hours, pizza events and Chewing the Fat talks to say hi in person and welcome them on board!
Hello! My name is Maya Binyam and I’m a farm intern this year with YSFP. I’m a sophomore here at Yale, majoring in English and Women’s Gender and Sexuality Studies. I grew up in Boston, but my family has since meandered all over the place so New Haven has become a wonderful new home to explore. It’s my first year with YSFP and I’m super excited to be a part of the team. Be sure to come by on volunteer workdays and say hi—I love chatting about food, cooking, agriculture more generally, and anything winter squash related. Happy farming!

A new school year means lots of new faces around the Sustainable Food Project offices and at the Yale Farm. We’ll be using this space to introduce you to some of them in the next few weeks; make sure to stop by work hours, pizza events and Chewing the Fat talks to say hi in person and welcome them on board!

Hello! My name is Maya Binyam and I’m a farm intern this year with YSFP. I’m a sophomore here at Yale, majoring in English and Women’s Gender and Sexuality Studies. I grew up in Boston, but my family has since meandered all over the place so New Haven has become a wonderful new home to explore. It’s my first year with YSFP and I’m super excited to be a part of the team. Be sure to come by on volunteer workdays and say hi—I love chatting about food, cooking, agriculture more generally, and anything winter squash related. Happy farming!

Wednesday, September 12, 2012
A new school year means lots of new faces around the Sustainable Food Project offices and at the Yale Farm. We’ll be using this space to introduce you to some of them in the next few weeks; make sure to stop by work hours, pizza events and Chewing the Fat talks to say hi in person and welcome them on board!
Hi all! My name is Sadie Weinberger and I am the Farmer’s Market Intern at the YSFP. I’m a junior majoring in Environmental Studies, with a possible concentration in Food and Agriculture or Religion. I’m from the tiny town of Nevada City, California, nestled in the lovely Sierra Nevada foothills and quite possibly the best place on earth. 
This year, I’ll be at the Yale Farm on Fridays and, more importantly, running the Yale Farm’s stand at the Wooster Square Market every Saturday from 9-1. Come visit me for veggies, just to chat, or if you’re dying to know how best to use those beautiful beets!

A new school year means lots of new faces around the Sustainable Food Project offices and at the Yale Farm. We’ll be using this space to introduce you to some of them in the next few weeks; make sure to stop by work hours, pizza events and Chewing the Fat talks to say hi in person and welcome them on board!

Hi all! My name is Sadie Weinberger and I am the Farmer’s Market Intern at the YSFP. I’m a junior majoring in Environmental Studies, with a possible concentration in Food and Agriculture or Religion. I’m from the tiny town of Nevada City, California, nestled in the lovely Sierra Nevada foothills and quite possibly the best place on earth. 

This year, I’ll be at the Yale Farm on Fridays and, more importantly, running the Yale Farm’s stand at the Wooster Square Market every Saturday from 9-1. Come visit me for veggies, just to chat, or if you’re dying to know how best to use those beautiful beets!

A new school year means lots of new faces around the Sustainable Food Project offices and at the Yale Farm. We’ll be using this space to introduce you to some of them in the next few weeks; make sure to stop by work hours, pizza events and Chewing the Fat talks to say hi in person and welcome them on board!
Hey, everyone. I’m Kendra, an “ad-hoc” intern at the farm this year! That means I do a little bit of everything, from making pizza to working the farmer’s market. I’m a junior at Yale, working on a degree in Ethnicity, Race and Migration, and I’m from suburban New York in a town where supermarkets have greatly replaced farms. I started working on Yale farm this summer as a Lazarus Intern, and since then I have discovered the joy of talking to the people who grow your food and eating a locally grown sungold tomato. Outside of the farm, I can be found lounging in my bed or making sandwiches.

A new school year means lots of new faces around the Sustainable Food Project offices and at the Yale Farm. We’ll be using this space to introduce you to some of them in the next few weeks; make sure to stop by work hours, pizza events and Chewing the Fat talks to say hi in person and welcome them on board!

Hey, everyone. I’m Kendra, an “ad-hoc” intern at the farm this year! That means I do a little bit of everything, from making pizza to working the farmer’s market. I’m a junior at Yale, working on a degree in Ethnicity, Race and Migration, and I’m from suburban New York in a town where supermarkets have greatly replaced farms. I started working on Yale farm this summer as a Lazarus Intern, and since then I have discovered the joy of talking to the people who grow your food and eating a locally grown sungold tomato. Outside of the farm, I can be found lounging in my bed or making sandwiches.